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Large Fiscal Spending Promises

Key Points

  • Budget 2020 revealed larger-than-expected potential spending in response to COVID-19.
  • However, detail was lacking on many spending priorities.
  • The accompanying larger bond issuance programme may prove difficult for the market to digest, placing upward pressure on government bond yields.

     

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Hamish Pepper | Posted on May 15, 2020
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Will RBNZ QE help bridge the gap and how does it work?

What is the Reserve Bank of New Zealand’s (RBNZ’s) Quantitative Easing (QE) programme?After cutting the Official Cash Rate (OCR) by 75bp to 0.25% on March 16th, the RBNZ launched its Large Scale Asset Purchase (LSAP), or QE programme, just one week later.  LSAP has a target to buy $30bn of government bonds over the next year; equivalent to 10% of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and, at the time, almost 50% of outstanding bonds ma...

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Hamish Pepper | Posted on May 6, 2020
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QE in New Zealand – A rising tide lifts most boats

Key Points

  • The RBNZ’s quantitative easing (QE), Large Scale Asset Purchase (LSAP) programme has kicked off to a very promising start.
  • In a tug-of-war between massive Reserve Bank purchases and NZ Treasury issuance, the Reserve Bank is winning.
  • The New Zealand Local Government Authority raised $1.1billion in new bonds issued today – a record amount.
  • Along with better COVID-19 news in New Zealand and a rebound in equities, we are starting to see better activity in high grade NZ credit.
  • The market is hoping this will flow through to the broader credit market. Early signs are encouraging, but the jury is out on the poor cousins at the lower end of the credit spectrum.
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Mark Brown
Mark Brown | Posted on Apr 9, 2020
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How this could be different to the GFC

Key Points

  • Headlines around COVID-19 outside of Asia have continued to worsen and, coupled with the oil spat between Russia and Saudi Arabia, have sharply reduced investment sentiment and created pockets of financial stress.
  • While sentiment is clearly downbeat, we need to recognise that there is still a wide range of outcomes that can occur.
  • In the event COVID-19 does result in recession, note all recessions have been different.
  • While this volatility is unsettling, it is important to put this sell-off in historical context.
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Harbour Team | Posted on Mar 13, 2020
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Surprise cuts necessary, but not sufficient

Key Points

  • Overnight, the US Federal Reserve executed an out-of-cycle 50 basis point cut as financial conditions have deteriorated sharply over the last week.
  • The closed circuit of declining confidence driving lower risk appetite, leading to increased financial stress and back to declining confidence, can be broken by government fiscal policy and monetary policy stimulus.
  • We expect a concerted global effort across governments and central banks to support economic growth. New Zealand will be part of that effort.
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George Henderson | Posted on Mar 4, 2020
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Monitoring the US leveraged loan market

Investors have their noses to the wind for the source of the next crisis. The terrifyingly titled pile of debt, known as “leveraged loans”, could be starting to pong. At Harbour we remain vigilant, monitoring the US market, but taking comfort in the structure of markets down under.

Leveraged loans are simply private market borrowing by sub-investment grade companies. The US leveraged loan marketplace provides well over $US...

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Simon Pannett
Simon Pannett | Posted on Feb 13, 2020
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NZ Monetary Policy: Diminishing Returns

The Reserve Bank of New Zealand (RBNZ) kept the Official Cash Rate (OCR) at 1.0% at its OCR Review this week, surprising the market with a rather sanguine tone, given the deteriorating global backdrop.

The RBNZ noted that both fiscal and monetary policy have scope to provide additional stimulus.

As the OCR plumbs new lows, questions are being raised over the efficacy of additional rate cuts.

This note highlights potential i...

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Hamish Pepper | Posted on Sep 26, 2019
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Banks make a start on new capital

A new capital security issued on Tuesday night by Westpac Banking Corporation (Westpac) has highlighted the lack of higher-yielding opportunities available for New Zealand-based investors.

Banks fund the loans they make from deposits, bonds and shareholders’ contributions.  In Australia, that’s also the order in which funds are repaid in the event of default.  To go into further detail, there’s also a class of securities that...

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Simon Pannett | Posted on Jul 18, 2019
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Responsible investing extends beyond a green label

Contact Energy has announced its intentions to raise capital via a “green bond”.  

A green bond is a debt security that has been verified to be backing assets, or projects, that have positive environmental or climate change benefits. 

Green bonds can bring societal benefits by facilitating funding for projects with positive environmental impacts. Just as credit ratings indicate the likelihood of a bond defaulting, the green ...

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Simon Pannett | Posted on Feb 15, 2019
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Core NZ inflation pressures, lifting towards 2 percent

This week saw the release of NZ CPI inflation for Q4 2018.  While headline annual inflation measure remained below 2%, the details showed core underlying pressures a little stronger than expected and continuing to lift to target. Rather than sparking any immediate change in policy direction, in our view, the CPI release will see the RBNZ continuing to “watch, worry, and wait”.

Leading into the CPI release, the market had been...

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Mark Brown | Posted on Jan 25, 2019